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POT-LUCK LOTUS

for sale

FOR $40.00 each potted in

12 inch pots

CLICK THE FILE ABOVE TO DOWN LOAD OUR BOG-MARGINAL  PLANT PICTURES WITH NAME AND DESCIPTION

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CURRENT RETAIL PLANT AVAILABILITY LIST:

Wholesale Customers:

SAS has worked hard to keep the quality and pricing of our

 ready to install pond plants the same since the late 1990’s.

 As a result, SAS now has new wholesale discount pricing policies based on the number of individual varieties of plants purchased per order. Discounts for Pond Construction or Maintenance supplies are now based on the total order amount, per purchase. Discounts on fish are based on volume quantities for each individual purchase.

To receive updated plant lists with wholesale quantity discounts, please email SAS at office@sasponds.com

provide your business name, address, phone and email 

info in wholesale discount application request.

If you are a PA sales tax exempt organization, you must 

provide a current form PA form: REV-1220 AS + (3-96)

To SAS prior to any order pickup or payments

fax: 610.388.3093


 ALL PLANTS PURCHASED FROM SAS ARE READY TO GO DIRECTLY INTO YOUR POND.

SUBMERGED PLANTS: are sold in our custom 'plant wrap'  (the materials are non-toxic). If the wrapped plant is intended to grow on the bottom of your pond, it will have a small stone set within the wrap. If the plant is ment to float on the pond surface, it will not have a stone. LEAVE THE PLANTS IN THE WRAP MATERIAL, roots will grow through the material.

FLOATING PLANTS: Such as azzolla, water hyacinth, water lettuce, floating moss etc... are not potted or wrapped. They are sold either by the each or unit of measure.

WATER LILIES AND LOTUS: Are sold in pots with-out-holes. The pot rim is intended to be submerged below the water surface. See plant care instructions for water depth. The soil is topped with stone to help keep the fish from digging in the soil. Larger stones can be set ontop of the pot, if required.

BOG-MARGINAL PLANTS: All of these plants are prepared in either pots without holes if the pot is intended to be completely submerged, or pots ith holes if only the bottom of the pot is to be submerged. Soil ontop of the soil is used to weigh the plant down and to protect it, as well as esthetic purposes. See plant care below for septh requirements.

                 AQUATIC  PLANT CARE                  

Winter Hardy Water Lilies:

Classified as Lilies

Where to put it: Place the plant in your pond in a location that will receive at least 4 hours of direct, bright sunlight per day. The rim of the pot should have at least 10" to 12" of water over it. Our Lily plants are potted in shallow 5” or 7" deep pots. If you place the pot in the deep end, you may want to erect a pedestal to raise the pot closer to the surface. Once the plant spreads beyond your desired coverage, lower its position on the pedestal, this will shorten the spread of the leaves. Be aware not to lower a plant so deep that its leaves can not float on the water surface.

Fertilizing:  See Note # 1.

Flowers and Pruning: Remove dead leaves and flowers once brown. Lilies flower freely when receiving enough light and repotted and fertilized regularly. Each flower will open each morning at sunrise and close as the sun sets in the late afternoon. This cycle lasts for 3 to 4 days per flower. Some plant varieties have flowers and leaves that rise above the water surface. Refer to plant description for leaf, flower size and height.

Winter protection: See Note # 2.

 

Tropical Water Lilies, Water sensitive, Mosaic plants

Classified as Lilies or lily-like plants

Where to put it: Place the plant in your pond in a location that will receive at least 4 hours of direct, bright sunlight per day. The rim of the pot should have at least 10" to 12" of water over it. Our Lily plants are potted in shallow 5” or 7" high pots. If you place the pot in the deep end, you may want to erect a pedestal to raise the pot closer to the surface. Once the plant spreads beyond your desired coverage, lower its position on the pedestal, this will shorten the spread of the leaves. Be aware not to lower a plant so deep that its leaves can not float on the water surface.

Fertilizing: See Note # 1.

Flowers and Pruning: Remove dead leaves and flowers once brown. Lilies flower freely when receiving enough light and repotted and fertilized regularly. Each flower will open each morning at sunrise and close as the sun sets in the late afternoon. This cycle lasts for 3 to 4 days per flower. Some plant varieties have flowers and leaves that rise above the water surface. Refer to plant description for leaf and flower size and height. Tropical lilies tend to have larger leaves (with exception of the miniature varieties) and spread more rapidly than winter hardy varieties. Flower color has a larger range including purples and blues.

Winter protection:  All Tropical plants will not tolerate our zone 6 winters and require relocation to greenhouses or having sections removed and stored for repotting in spring.  Refer to winter newsletter for further suggestions. It is very important to remove the plants and to avoid letting them die in the pond. This will cause problems with water quality all winter and spring until the pond is cleaned. We provide a winter trade-in program for pond owners who do not have greenhouses available for their use.

Winter Hardy Water Lotus:

Classified as Lotus

Where to put it: Place the plant in your pond in a location that will receive at least 4 hours of direct, bright sunlight per day. The rim of the pot should be just below the water surface by no more than 3". Our Lotus plants are potted in various sized pots. If you place the pot in the deep end, you will have to erect a pedestal to raise the pot closer to the surface. Lotus leaves and flowers rise high above the water surface. Once the plant is well established, it may tolerate water dept up to 2’, depending on the variety.

Fertilizing: See Note # 1.

Flowers and Pruning: Remove dead leaves and flowers once brown. Lotus flower freely when receiving enough light and repotted and fertilized regularly. Each flower will open each morning at sunrise and close as the sun sets in the late afternoon. This cycle lasts for 3 to 4 days per flower. The plant will set out runners that may spread throughout the pond if not controlled. Tuck the runner back into the pot to increase the size and number of booms. The seed pods produced after each bloom is attractive & frequently used in dried flower arrangements.

Winter protection:  See Note #2.

 

Water Poppy, Floating Heart, Floating Fringe, Snowflake, Parrots Feather:

Classified as Lily type plants

These plants are all potted in shallow pots (5” to 7” deep) or rooted in our black wrap material that should not be removed.  They are classified as Tender Perennials in zone 6, meaning that in most cases, when properly protected for winter; they will survive in our ponds, if not eaten by the fish in the winter.

Where to put it: Place the plant in your pond in a location that will receive at least 4 hours of bright sunlight per day. The rim of the pot should have at least 4" to 6" of water over it. If you place the pot in the deep end, you may want to erect a pedestal to raise the pot closer to the surface. Once the plant spreads beyond your desired coverage, lower its position on the pedestal, this will shorten the spread of the leaves. Be aware not to lower a plant so deep that its leaves can not float on the water surface. Parrot feather will tolerate more shade than flowering varieties.

Fertilizing: See Note # 1.

Flowers and Pruning: Remove dead leaves and flowers once brown. These plants all flower freely when receiving enough light and proper pH. Each flower will open each morning at sunrise and close as the sun sets in the late afternoon. This cycle lasts for 1 to 4 days per flower.  Refer to plant description for leaf and flower size and height. These plants spread by producing runners from the mother plant. To avoid their spreading all over the pond, push runners into the mother plant pot. This will keep the plant from looking leggy.

Winter protection: See Note # 2.

Oxygenators: (fully submerged plants)

Classified as submerged plants

Do not rely sourly on these plants to oxygenate your pond. They only produce oxygen during photosynthesis, which required sunlight. They actually take in oxygen at night.

Where to put it: These plants come potted in shallow pots or soil-less wraps and should be placed at the bottom of the pond in about 8 to 18" of water. Be sure that the foliage is not so deep that it cannot receive sunlight. The leaves are stacked onto a brittle thin stem that continues to grow and reach for the sun at the water's surface.

Flowers and Pruning: Once it is near the surface, you may see small dainty white flowers breach the water surface and lift their heads a couple of inches above the water. As the plant gets longer, pinch back the plant tips and push them into the pot to increase the density of the plant. Be sure that the plant is not directly under a dense floating foliage plant that could block the sun light from the oxygenator.

Fertilizing:  These plants serve as food and shelter for aquatic life as well as processing wastes and nitrites from the water. Therefore we do not recommend fertilizing these submerged plants. They are mini waste disposal factories within your pond. Fertilizing reduces their need to do their job.

Winter protection:  We have very good success wintering these plants over if properly protected. This means placing the pot with foliage in the deep end of the pond, but where it will receive sunlight. It may live only to be consumed by the fish.

Duck Weeds, azolla, fairy moss and other small

floating plants:

Classified as floating plants

Where to put it: These tiny plants float on the water surface as individual plants. They are not potted. Fish love to eat this green treat.

Flowers and Pruning: no pruning is required. Some varieties may produce small flowers.

Fertilizing: These plants serve as food and shade for your pond and its fish. No fertilizing required.

Winter protection: Most are not winter hardy, but may drop seeds that will survive to grow in the spring.

Water Lettuce, regular or rosette, Water Hyacinths:

Classified as floating plants, tropical in zone 6

Where to put it: These plants float on the water surface as individual plants. They are not potted. Fish love to eat this green treat and can completely consume the roots.

Flowers and Pruning: No pruning is required. Water hyacinths produce lavender flowers, and then they produce runners from the mother plant. Shell flowers act the same without flowering. The spreaders become mature plants and eventually break away from the parent plant to begin their own spreading family. Each water hyacinth blooms only once and lasts about 4 days.

Fertilizing: These plants serve as food and shade for your pond and its fish. No fertilizing required.  The fish will often strip the roots and eat them.

Winter protection: These are tropical and not winter hardy.  Remove before they die and pollute pond. They work great in compost as a moist green addition to the mix.

Winter Hardy Iris, accorus and similar plants:

Classified as marginal or bog plants

Where to put it: Place the plant in your pond in a location that will receive bright sunlight or indirect light for most of the day. The rim of the pot should have no more than 2" of water over it. Our Iris plants are potted in shallow 5” or 7" high pots. If you place the pot in the deep end, you will want to erect a pedestal to raise the pot closer to the surface. Plants will tolerate short periods of drier soil.

Fertilizing: They were fertilized when potted so your plants should not need to be fertilized for one growing season after purchasing. Due to conditions in your pond, you may choose to boost your bloom production for the next year by fertilizing with special plant tabs. They are available in our distribution center. Follow directions as to time and quantity of fertilizer. Too much fertilizer may cause havoc with your water quality.

Flowers and Pruning: Remove dead leaves and flowers once brown. Iris have green 1" to 2" wide spiked foliage that reaches between to 4 feet in height. They flower in the spring. Yellow are first followed by Blues, Purple, Red and Black Gamecock is usually the last to flower. The flowers are clustered at the top of a stem that appears from within a grouping of leaves and stand 1 to 2 feet above the foliage. The flowers bloom from the top down the stem to the bottom of the cluster. Each flower lasts a few days, depending on rain which can damage the fragile flowers. Total flowering of the cluster lasts 1 to 3 weeks, dependant upon the size of the plant. Be sure to remove seed pods before they swell. The nutrients required to produce the seeds will deplete the plant of the nutrients required for blooms the next year. Some forms of this plant do not flower and have variegated leaves. These should be treated the same as flowering varieties.

Winter protection:  See Note #1

.

Pickerel Plant, Blue & White:

Classified as marginal or bog plants

Where to put it: Place the pot in a sunny location with no more than 3" of water over the rim of the pot. Plants will tolerate short periods of drier soil.

Fertilizing:  May increase the number of blooming cycles in one season. Use only aquatic plant tabs.

Flowers and Pruning: Pickerel Plants have foliage that resembles spears on top of a shaft. Their thick green stems reach 3 feet in height and are adorned by an 8" inch green leaf. The flowers appear to be one long flower, but actually they are 4" clusters of very small flowers. This plant is a late starter, but once it begins it will bloom on and off all summer long till frost. When in flower its nectar is the food source for many kinds of Moths, Butterflies and Hummingbirds.

Winter protection: See Note # 1

Cattails, water bamboo and assorted grasses:

Classified as marginal or bog plants

Where to put it: Place the pot in a sunny location with no more than 10" of water over the rim of the pot. Plants will tolerate short periods of drier soil.

Fertilizing: As with many bog plants, fertilizing will only produce more leaves. We do not advise fertilizing more than twice a season.

Flowers and Pruning: Cattails come in thin, medium and wide leaf widths. The wider the leaf, the larger the "cattail". Most varieties reach heights of 6 to 8 feet and may require stacking if exposed to strong wind. Remove dead foliage as seen. If you do not want cattails springing up in any moist spot in your yard, then remove the 'flowers or cattails' before they explode in October. You can dry these and spray them with clear acrylic paint or hair spray to use indoors all year long as decorations.

Winter protection: See Note # 1

Rushes, Thalia and Winter Hardy Canna,

Chinese Water Chestnuts: 

Classified as marginal or bog plants

Where to put it: Place the pot in a sunny location with no more than 4" of water over the rim of the pot. Some varieties will tolerate short periods of drier soil.

Fertilizing: May increase the number of blooming cycles in one season. Use only aquatic plant tabs.

Flowers and Pruning: Rushes resemble 3 or 5 foot long knitting needles. They come in green and horizontally variegated varieties such as Zebra or Rainbow Rush.  These plants set off a flower that resembles Queens Anne Lace near the top of the spike. They require very little pruning during the year. Water Chestnuts may be harvested in fall for eating or to propagate new plants.

Winter protection: See Note # 1.

Flowering Arrowhead, Lobelia, For-get-me-nots, Celery, Creeping Jenny, Hoytonia, & Golden Club, Mints:

Classified as marginal plants

Where to put it: Place this plant with no more than 2" of water over the rim.

Fertilizing:  With aquatic plant tabs, is advisable early in the season to give this plant a boost.

Flowers and Pruning: This plant is an annual which multiplies by spreading roots or dropping seeds. The roots set off leaves and eventually if severed from the parent plant, form new plants. White flowers appear in July and are sweetly scented. You do not purchase this plant for its flowers; they are nice, but short lived.

Winter protection: All of these perennial varieties die off in winter. The flower's function is to sets seeds which drop into the pond and survive the winter to swell when the frost is over and sprout into mini duplicates of the parent plant. The roots generally do not survive our winters, but do not discard the pot; seeds may have fallen in and will grow in the spring. You may want to store bulbs indoors or treat this plant as an annual.

 

Tropical Canna, Taro, Sagittaria, Mellon swords:

Classified as marginal or bog plants

Where to put it: Place the pot in a sunny location with no more than 4" of water over the rim of the pot.

Fertilizing: May increase the number of blooming cycles in one season. Use only aquatic plant tabs.

Flowers and Pruning: These plants come in many combinations of leaf and flower color. The more exotic type of canna reach a height of 8 to 10 feet and bear purple flowers which become red/purple fruits in late summer. Taro usually does not flower, but has unique colored large leaves. Sagittaria is a taller wide leaved plant good for screening. Prune any dead foliage. You may want to remove seed pods to increase flower production. Some birds and animals will eat the smaller varieties of seeds.

Winter protection:  All of these tropical plants require storage in a greenhouse for our zone 6 winters.

Papyrus or Paper Reed:

Classified as marginal or bog plants

Where to put it: Place the pot in a bright location with no more than 2" of water over the rim of the pot.

Flowers and Pruning: Papyrus is also known as the paper plant, its fibers were used centuries ago for making parchment. The flowers are understated and appear as accents of new foliage in the crown of the leaf cluste

Fertilizing: May increase the size of the plants. Use only aquatic plant tabs. We fertilize before they are sold

Winter protection: This is an annual plant, but unlike most others, this serves well as a house plant during the winter months. Before frost, remove it from the pond, spray it with a safe insecticide and bring it indoors. Place the pot in a decorative planter that is water tight, so the roots remain wet as they were in the pond. You may see the plant die back while it acclimates itself to the change in light and temperature, cut it back and it will re-sprout.

Bog Lilies, Water Spider:

Classified as marginal or bog plants

Where to put it: Place the pot in a very sunny location with no more than 2" of water over the rim of the pot.

Flowers and Pruning: These plants all flower at least once per season. They require very little pruning.

Fertilizing: May increase the number of blooming cycles in one season. Use only aquatic plant tabs

Winter protection: This tropical plant requires greenhouse winter storage. Or you can store the bulbs indoors to replant in the spring.

 

Florida Crypt, Blue Bell, Wedelia:

Classified as marginal or bog plants

Where to put it: Place the pot in a very sunny location with no more than 2" of water over the rim of the pot. These plants can be planted in moist soil along pond perimeter.

Flowers and Pruning: These plants all flower several times per season. They require very little pruning. Most plants spread by runners and seed distribution. You may have to control runners by relocating or pruning

Fertilizing: May increase the number of blooming cycles in one season. Use only aquatic plant tabs.

Winter protection: These are either annuals or tender perennials. Mulch ground plants, submerge aquatic plants or take cuttings and bring indoors for winter.

Note # 1 Fertilizing: They were fertilized when potted so your plants should not need to be fertilized for one growing season after purchasing. Due to conditions in your pond, you may choose to boost your bloom production by fertilizing with special plant tabs. They are available in our distribution center. Follow directions as time and quantity of fertilizer. Too much fertilizer may cause havoc with your water quality.

 

Note # 1 Winter Protection:  All winter hardy plants will tolerate our zone 7 winters if given adequate protection. This means placing the plant in water at least 18" deep to the top of pot. The deep water will serve to as insulation against the wind and extreme temperature change. Refer to winter newsletter for further suggestions. Only a small piece of root has to survive to produce a new plant in spring.

Note # 2 Winter protection:  All winter hardy plants will tolerate our zone 6 winters if given adequate protection. This means placing the plant in water that does not freeze solid and is at least 18" deep to the top of plant pot. The deep water will serve to as insulation against the wind and extreme temperature change. Refer to winter newsletter for further suggestions.

All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise, without the prior written permission of the Author, Pamela J. Stephens Schlett.